We’re changing the conversation in 2016

Olivia Zink on February 26, 2015

Private companies invest millions in lobbying and election campaigns in order to pass policies that guarantee profits regardless of the human cost. Download the full infographic to see how money spent on lobbying affects policy, profits, and the rest of the world. 

In the lead-up to the first caucuses in Iowa and the first primary in New Hampshire, AFSC is shining a spotlight on the excessive influence of powerful corporations. Asking challenging questions of the candidates early in the presidential nominating process can influence the national conversation.

Private companies invest millions in lobbying for policies that guarantee profits regardless of the human cost. These policies result in increased militarism and incarceration. Download the full infographic to see how money spent on lobbying affects policy, profits, and the rest of the world.

The next time you run into a candidate, ASK about:

  • Corporations that profit from war use their taxpayer-derived funds to influence public policy.  More wars and higher military budgets benefit those corporations but don’t serve the public interest.  How will you end governing under the influence?    
  • When Pentagon contractors spend millions of dollars on lobbying and elections, all to get more contracts.  How can we return power to the people to set military and foreign policy?
  • Giant corporations seem to have unlimited funds to buy insider access to Congress.  What steps will you take to prevent corporate cronyism from corrupting our government and economy?
  • Lockheed has been recycling taxpayer dollars to lobby for more nuclear weapons contracts.  What steps would you take to make sure the nation’s security policy is not drive by Lockheed’s profit motives?
  • Companies that run for-profit prisons lobby actively for policies that benefit them.  One such policy is the immigrant detention bed mandate, a quota of 34,000 beds that must be filled every night.   How will you limit the ability of firms like the Corrections Corporation of America and the Geo Group to set our immigration policy?  
  • In recent years local police forces have been acquiring military weapons and vehicles.   This harms our communities, but it is good for the bottom lines of the companies that sell these goods to the government.  What will you do to limit the influence of companies that profit from militarization of our local police?    
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